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20130211
20130219
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
across the board, 8% to the pentagon, you have been looking at the kind of impact this will have. what you expect? how much damage you think it would do four different operations? >> needless to say, being an appropriate, but think it is an idiotic way to do business. these are indiscriminate cuts. they are not thought through. they're just automatic across- the-board, without any consideration of good, bad or evil or whatever. so i think the cuts are devastating. i am sad to see take place. but i don't see any effort being made realistically to stop it. >> do you think that, once the sequestered takes effect, that people will see the wide ranging implications and that there will actually start working together to figure out how to replace it or a verdict? >> that is my hope. number one, most of in the week to avoid it. i think it will have a shocking effect on so many agencies of the government that, hopefully -- >> what do you think it will take for people to say, finally, let's get together and figure out a way to not let this happen. >> because to the military are the most severe.
of the audience, these automatic indiscriminate across-the-board cuts, 5% to domestic agencies, 8% to the pentagon, you've been looking at the kind of impact this will have. what do you expect? how much damage do you think it would do for government operations? how badly would it affect your constituents and people across the country? >> well, needless to say, being an appropriator, i think it's an idiotic way to do business. these are indiscriminate cuts. they're not thought through but are automatic across the board without any consideration of good, bad or evil, or whatever. so i think the cuts are devastating. i'm sad to see it take place but i don't see an effort being made realistically to stop it. >> do you, mr. chairman, do you think that once the sequester actually takes effect, that people will see the wide ranging implications of this and they would actually start working together to figure out the best way to either avert it or replace it? >> that's my hope. i'm hoping, number one, i was hoping we could avoid it. but after it hits, which i think it will, i think it's going to have a sh
panetta spoke at a pentagon farewell ceremony. he talked about north korea and called on congress to end the uncertainty posed by pending budget cuts known as sequestration. mr. panetta will stay in his position until his successor is confirmed. president obama has nominated former senator chuck hagel to be his replacement. this is half an hour. [applause] >> halt. present. halt. ♪ o say can you see by the dawn's early light snule what so -- what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there o say does that star spangled banner yet wave oaer the land of the free and the home of the brave ♪ >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the director of administration and management, mr. michael rhodes. >> well, welcome, everybody. thank you very much for being here today. as we have an opportunity for the secretary's farewell address to the pentagon c
federal government except the pentagon. all of a sudden the last couple of months hitting this arbitrary political target is vital. what is vital, as i said, is having a deficit strategy that's consistent with sound economic growth and making sure that we strengthen the middle class and that means as a first step to make sure that our deficits, as the economy improves, as we grow, that our deficits are not growing faster than g.d.p. and that we stabilize the debt as a percentage of g.d.p. because if you don't, as the economy improves, higher government borrowing -- we need to adopt that strategy and adopt it now. have it kicked in over a period of time. we just got very good news that the rate of per capita increase in health care costs is actually at the lowest level of 50 years. we need to continue to adopt strategies to keep that -- those costs increase low. as as demographic changes means baby boomers retire and we clearly need to keep working on those issues. but let me just sum up where we are in terms of our deficit reduction targets. over the last little over two years we have no
to continue on the washington post article that came all recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that would keep only 8000 troops in afghanistan. general austin, can you support a plan that was scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? we are looking at the withdrawal of troops in afghanistan. according to this article, from 8000 to about 1000 in a short period and of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends on troops on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are at that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i would really work hard to make sure i fully understood what to the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. my advice as a commander on the ground or a commander of central command -- i would provide my advice to them based upon where i think the security forces are , the conditions in the theater, and what i think we need to do to move full word to make sure we maintai
appropriate, too. the cia to the pentagon, he has demonstrated the highest caliber of integrity, wisdom, and patriotism. he has been a great partner and a great friend. what he said about humanity and being a human being in this role is worth repeating. it is easy to get caught up in the work and the intensity, the drive that is necessary to work those long days and short nights. it is sometimes too easy to forget why we do what we do, both military and civilian. for many of you, it has been a career choice, both my colleagues from the defense department and rom state, for others of us, it is something that we came to later and were involved in luckily and gave us a chance to serve. for all of us remembering why we do this work and how important it is to the future, especially future generations, is something leon panetta has never forgotten. i know that as leon heads back to california, he will, along with is absolutely wonderful wife, sylvia, continue to use the panetta institute to train the next generation of leaders. i also want to say a special word of thanks to general dempsey. i
that came out recently. it did suggest the pentagon is pushing the pentagon that would only keep 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the process so far, but can you support a plan that was scheduled withdraws troops in advance? you know, we're looking at withdraws troops in afghanistan and according to thisarticle from a passing down to 1000 within a short period of time, i ve questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdraw when sec previously, so much depends on the ground, what the government is doing, what variability eyes up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood with the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. certainly my advice is the commander on the ground or commander central command would ovide my advice based upon breaking the security forces are and the conditions in theater and what i think we need to do to move forward to make sure we maintain the gain
. as is widely recognized, sequestration over the next 10 years apply to the pentagon budget would only reduce it in inflation adjusted terms to what it was in 2007 a. the most powerful military in the world -- 2007, as the most powerful military in the world engaged in a war in iraq and the challenge in afghanistan. if members of congress pay attention to the facts, they will see a clear path to dramatically reduce pentagon spending without undermining america's position as being the most powerful nation on the planet. and nobody has done a better job of highlighting a path forward, an area of opportunity, than walter pinkus writhing on the pages of the "washington post" over the last couple years as he details the sweep of our nuclear weapons program and the spending trajectory. this morning's latest offering should be required reading for every member of congress and the ones who whine the loutest should be forced to read it -- loudest should be forced to read it twice. he details a vast array of nuclear weapons already deployed, ready to be deployed within 30 minutes, a relic of our conten
to the cia, to the pentagon, he has demonstrated the highest caliber of and secretintegrity and wisd. he is not only been a great partner but a great friend. i think you have to postpone for a while removing the 8 seconds delay for the sensors until he actually does leave the building. [laughter] but what he said the documentary, about being a human being in these roles, as brett repeating. it is easy to get so caught up with until the work and intensity, the drive necessary to work those long days and short night's. it is sometimes too easy to forget why we do what we do, both military and civilian. for many of you, it has been a career choice. both my colleagues from the defense department and from state. for others of us, it is something that became too later and were involved in luckily becky was a chance to serve. but for all of us, remembering why we do this work and how important it is to the future, especially future generations, is something leon panetta has never forgotten. i know that as leon does eventually head back to california, he will, along with this wonderful wife, con
to look at the ongoing waste, fraud, and abuse going on over at the pentagon. i cannot for the life of me figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item on our budget cannot be audited. we need the pentagon to pass an audit so we can get to know where the money is and where our tax dollars are going and adequately set priorities. let me just ask you about the cbo report on the american recovery and reinvestment act. i would like to ask you -- can you explain how our governments targeted investment in the american people and in our nation's critical infrastructure -- how that created jobs and how it helped to begin to grow the economy? and also, if we invested in a program that provided coordinated benefits in social services that was the the long- term economic stability and income -- what income would that be? what impact would that have in terms of our economic growth? >> congresswoman, as you know, we had an estimated -- we have estimated consistently for the past four years that the recovery act, taking effect at the time it did with the economic circumstances
is astounding. the pentagon needs to be pared down. me the pentagon to look at their own priorities." we are pressed for times. -- the pentagon needs to look at their own priorities." we are pressed for times. you agree with this general perception that senator hagel -- chuck hagel made. that would be great. >> that is a good question. it is a fair question. i cannot speak for senator hagel. my interpretation is that it is along the lines of something that secretary gates used to say. we had accumulated over the decade post 9/11 when our budget was going up every year. when your budget goes year and year out, it is fair to say we have a management problem, all of our managers, it was easy to reach for more money to solve your managing problem, whether it is a technical problem in a program or something like that. it was noticeable to me that the logistics in some places that have accumulated over the decades. that is my secretary gates started his efficiency initiative, which i was part of. our efforts to reform the system improved our performance. in parallel, we have absorbed billions
the pentagon, his answer was simple -- no. but i kept asking him. i am persistent. that is how michelle married me. i just kept at it, and it is a testament to his patriotism, to his sense of duty that leon agreed to serve on this one last tour. perhaps it was the memory of his parents opening their homes up to g.i.'s headed to the pacific. perhaps it was leon, who served himself, a young lieutenant in the army. perhaps it was the experience of watching his youngest son deployed to afghanistan. what we do know is this -- as our nation's's 23rd secretary of defense, in every action leon panetta has taken, every decision he has made has been with one goal in mind -- taking care of our sons and our daughters in uniform and keeping america safe. just think of the progress under his watch. because we ended the war in iraq, winding down the war in afghanistan, our troops are coming home, and next year our war in afghanistan will come to an end. we have put the core of al qaeda on the path to defeat. we have been relentless against its affiliates. because we have a sacred obligation to our troops to t
the pentagon and military posts have strong seasoned leadership teams. regardless of having the secretary or not having one is a portent concern. -- a point of concern. you have a good strong team that will be able to manage through this process. they have seen this coming. as you would expect the military to do, they are prepared. host: new hampshire, and the pennant caller -- caller: morning and thank you. i am so tired of the irresponsibility of the republicans. the chuck hagel thing is preposterous. how does it serve the nation to delay the president's choice? it is the first time in history that a filibuster has been used against a cabinet the sequester is the height of irresponsibility. why risk a potential double dip recession just so you can score political points? finally, you criticized the president for being out of washington and yet, -- that was and finally -- hear you are supporting a filibuster and finally, though you partly answer the question or just now, what your district and tails are large installations, i assume, other than fort campbell in your district. my brother
is served until 2009, and works in the pentagon. our first call, on the republican line. caller: my daughter serves in the marine corps. i'm very proud of my daughter. if we take and put our people out of afghanistan, what is going to prevent these people from going back over -- coming back over to our country, and a glowing us up again? we may have gotten rid of osama bin laden. what about everybody else? we have to protect our people, whether it is in afghanistan, africa, or wherever. we cannot allow our people totally out of this country just because president obama says, they are muslims, they are my fellow men, my fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with
with pentagon cuts. host: we have been asking people, as you know, what is the most important question on your mind for washington right now. what is your message to washington? what is most important? caller: from listening for a few minutes, the gentleman from gallup is totally off. i do not know where they get their information. the general public, i think, is very interested in gun control. i am for the second amendment. i think people can get around controls. also, infrastructure in the united states is very important for the average person. if we are going to give money to other countries, about giving us half of what we are going to give them? instead of $100 million to some country for some sewage system, how about $50 million? how about cutting everybody's money we are going to give them in half, and put the money into this country? host: thank you. next is a call from new mexico. what is your most important issue? caller: a lot of these issues are important and have been looming in washington for some time. one of the most pressing issues, obviously, is the gun control debate. i just
of those confirmed by the pentagon, making him the mosley that will sniper in american history. one thing about that is that chris was very unassuming and i remember knowing a little bit about his background but then meeting chris for the first time and how humble he was and how down to earth he was. he didn't really talk about records, he talked about people. he talked about what his job was, was to protect his fellow soldiers. his ability in the battlefield was unmatched. his longest shot came in 2008 when he identified an enemy insurgent that was about to launch a rocket near an army convoy. from 1.2 miles away, he fired his .338 magnum rifle and killed the insurgent, potentially saving the lives of countless americans. chris was rewarded -- awarded countless honors for his various he earned two silver starks five bronze stars, two navy and marine corps achievement medals and one navy and marine corps commendation. he was admires by people really all over the country. on this monday, about 7,000 or 8,000 people gathered in the dallas cowboys stadium in dallas, texas, to come and pay th
share but look at the ongoing waste, fraud and abuse going on at the pentagon. i can't for the life of me figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item on our budget cannot be audited. we need them to have an audit to know where our tax dollars are going and set priorities. let me ask you about the c.b.o. report on the american recovery and investment act. i would like to ask you, mr. director, can you explain how our government's targeted investment and the american people and in our nation's critical infrastructure, how that created jobs and how it helped to begin to grow the economy. and also if we invested in a program that provided coordinated benefits and social services that listed the long- term economic stability and incomes, say half the families living in poverty, what impact would that have overall in terms of our economic growth? >> as you know, we have estimated consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with the economic circumstances that the country faced, increased output and jobs relative t
and to the pentagon which this grant came from. we cannot abandon our soldiers who have served us well, and i would hope that the grant for this hospital will be continued because texas has been known to have the largest number of returning iraq and afghanistan troops. . that speaks loudly to the question of sequester, and i'm delighted to the president last evening could not have offered more olive branches on economic reform, tax reform, the idea that we can do this budget together. not a sequester, not a self-inflicted wound. it's what we did to ourselves. but more importantly to talk about innovation and growth. something that i have spoken about over and over again as a member formerly of the science committee and now homeland security. where is america's genius? right outside the beltway. why are we dividing ourselves along democrats and republicans refusing to put revenue alongside of cuts? mr. speaker, we are at the bone almost. and sequester that is across-the-board cuts will literally destroy us and put us in a recession. all the talking heads that are suggesting that the president was no
, fraud and abuse going on at the pentagon. i can't for the life of me figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item on our budget cannot be audited. we need them to have an audit to know where our tax dollars are going and set priorities. let me ask you about the c.b.o. report on the american recovery and investment act. i would like to ask you, mr. director, can you explain how our government's targeted investment and the american people and in our nation's critical infrastructure, how that created jobs and how it helped to begin to grow the economy. and also if we invested in a program that provided coordinated benefits and social services that listed the long-term economic stability and incomes, say half the families living in poverty, what impact would that have overall in terms of our economic growth? >> as you know, we have estimated consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with the economic circumstances that the country faced, increased output and jobs relative to what would have happened in the absence
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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